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Children with Reflux (GERD)

May 25th 2015

Whether your child is a toddler or a teenager, they will occasionally suffer from diarrhea, upset tummy, excessive burping, abdominal pain, or heartburn. Sometimes stress from a big event in a child’s life – such as the first day of school, exams, or a sporting event – triggers a digestive upset. However, when digestive disturbances in children become more frequent, it’s a good time to seek an opinion from a medical professional.
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Burping and GERD

May 25th 2015

heartburnPeople with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) tend to burp or belch more than those people without GERD. To see if excessive gas intake worsens GERD, researchers in the Netherlands examined this phenomenon.

As reported in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, to investigate, the researchers measured pressure, liquid, and acidity in the esophagus of 12 people with GERD and 12 healthy individuals before and after infusion of air into their stomachs. Those with GERD belched about 52 times during the 24-hour study, versus 7 times for the controls, and they swallowed air 287 times versus 176 times in the controls.
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GERD on the Rise

May 25th 2015

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common, chronic condition caused by the backflow of stomach contents, such as gastric acid, into the esophagus. The main symptoms include a burning, pressure-like sensation in the chest (heartburn), the sensation of food or liquid rising up the esophagus, and a bitter or sour taste in the mouth. Less common symptoms include persistent sore throat, hoarseness, chronic coughing, difficult or painful swallowing, asthma, unexplained chest pain, bad breath, feeling as if there is a lump in the throat, and an uncomfortable sense of fullness after meals.
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How to reduce the flatulence caused by pulses

May 25th 2015

PulsesIt’s a fact, pulses (legumes) tend to induce flatulence, but you should certainly not avoid them, as they are very nutritious. They are significantly rich in vitamins and minerals, protein, soluble fiber, which is beneficial for cardiovascular health, and have a low Glycemic Index, ideal for keeping you fuller for longer. In brief, they are a “must” on your plate!

All foods containing carbohydrates can encourage the production of gas in the large intestine. By carbohydrates we mean sugars, fibers and starch. When carbohydrates come from foods that are not completely digested (such as pulses), the production of gas increases even further.
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GERD and Heartburn Tips

May 25th 2015

heartburn-tipsIf you suffer from frequent heartburn, the most common symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), then even the most basic day-to-day life activities can affect your condition. What were once regular habits; such as eating, sleeping, and exercise, can be either aggravators or alleviators. The best approach for alleviating symptoms is a balanced lifestyle of food, exercise, sleep, and medication. Here are some things to consider:
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Diet and GERD

May 25th 2015

What is Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?


Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is the back flow of stomach contents into the esophagus. It occurs as a result of hiatus hernia (protrusion of part of the stomach through the diaphragm into the esophageal area), reflux esophagitis, abdominal pressure associated with obesity, or pregnancy pyrosis (heartburn). A ring of muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) encircles the esophagus at the entrance to the stomach. The LES relaxes to allow the passage of food into the stomach and then closes once food has passed thereby preventing the reflux of stomach contents. GERD is caused by a prolonged relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and delayed gastric emptying causing irritation of the esophagus by gastric acid, bile, and pepsin.
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Top Five Nutrition Changes as we Age

May 25th 2015

FourFriendsIt is no surprise that we have an aging population; those over the age of 65 are the fastest growing population group! It is estimated by year 2030, more than one in five will be over the age of 65 (Heath Canada, 2002). As we age, our nutrition needs shift from a focus on growth and development to maintenance, repair and reducing the risk of chronic disease like heart disease, stroke, diabetes, cancer, obesity and arthritis.

Today’s blog will highlight my top five nutritional changes as we age. My follow-up blog will discover my top 10 nutrition tips for an aging population.
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