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Diverticulosis / Diverticulitis: Tips and Information

Prevent inflammation and diverticulitis or treat it.

With our Diverticulosis / Diverticulitis Meal Plans, you stack the odds in your favour. To take maximum advantage of our meal plans, take the time to read the information below.

Important Advice and Useful Tips for Diverticulosis

What you SHOULD do

  • To find out which calorie level is right for you, compute your estimated energy requirements (EER). To find out what your healthy body weight is, compute your body mass index (BMI)
  • Exercise! Walking is particularly effective. Being physically active can help prevent the formation of diverticula and prevent flare-up.
  • Chew food thoroughly.
  • Drink enough fluids, i.e. 1 to 2 liters/quarts each day, including water, milk, soup, tea, coffee, juice, etc., distributed throughout the day. since fiber needs water to be effective.
  • Give preference to foods fortified with probiotics, especially type Bifidobacterium or type Lactobacillus (e.g. L. casei), or ask your pharmacist to recommend suitable supplements.
  • Contrary to popular belief, nuts and seeds of certain fruits (kiwi, raspberries, strawberries, etc.) cannot settle in the diverticula, or cause inflammation. There is therefore no danger in eating these foods in a reasonable quantity, i.e. as recommended by Canada’s Food Guide.
  • This menu is also suitable for people suffering from constipation.
  • Consult your Doctor if you have a medical condition. We also recommend that you consult a Registered Dietitian and tell her/him that you follow the SOSCuisine Meal Plans.

What you should watch out for

  • It is possible that your symptoms will persist for some time before you start feeling better. This is normal and you should not stop following the program. Maximum therapeutical benefits from the meal plans are reached after following them for at least three months.
  • There is no evidence that taking fiber supplements can help alleviate the disease. On the contrary, this can even be harmful unless prescribed by your doctor. On the other hand, it is strongly recommended to consume enough fiber through foods, which is exactly what our Diverticulosis Meal Plans assure.

What you should NOT do

  • Do not hold back unnecessarily. When you need to go to the toilet, do not wait. Holding back your stool can make its consistency harder.
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Important Advice and Useful Tips for Diverticulitis

What you SHOULD do

  • Chew food thoroughly
  • Drink enough fluids, i.e. 1 to 2 liters/quarts each day, including water, milk, soup, tea, coffee, juice, etc., distributed throughout the day
  • Consult your Doctor if you have a medical condition. We also recommend that you consult a Registered Dietitian and tell her/him that you follow the SOSCuisine Meal Plans.

What you should watch out for

  • Remove seeds and skins from fruits and vegetables
  • Diverticultis Meal Plans can help you feel better during the medical treatment, because this diet gives your digestive tract a chance to rest

What you should NOT do

  • Diverticulitis signs and symptoms should begin to resolve two or three days after you begin medical treatment for your diverticulitis.
  • Contact your doctor if:
    • You don’t feel better in two or three days
    • You develop a fever
    • Your abdominal pain is worsening
    • You’re unable to keep clear liquids down
  • These may indicate a complication that requires medication or hospitalization.
Healthy with Pleasure Meal Plans
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FAQ: Diverticulosis / Diverticulitis

Can these meal plans cure diverticular disease?

Today, little scientific evidence concludes that a high-fiber diet promotes the regression of existing diverticula, or prevents inflammation (diverticulitis). However, it seems beneficial for people with diverticular disease, who have no complications, to eat a high amount of dietary fiber.
Source: Handbook of Clinical Nutrition, OPDQ, 2010

Can I replace some recipes or meals during the program?

During the maintenance phase (diverticulosis), you can replace recipes or meals at leisure. However, during phases ‘Diverticulitis’ and ‘Diverticulosis, introduction’, you must follow the meal plans exactly as proposed, as they are carefully calibrated and any departure could delay the improvement of your condition.

Weight Loss Meal Plans
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Info Nutrition: Diverticulosis / Diverticulitis

The most recent recommendations (references) to prevent inflammation and/or infection of the diverticula consist of 28 nutritional targets that must be attained day after day, to bring about positive changes.

  • Proper daily calorie intake. We offer two levels: 1,700 and 2,100 calories, to best meet your own needs.
  • Optimal intakes of vitamins and minerals, especially sodium
  • Optimal intakes and distribution of carbs, fat and protein
  • Optimal intakes of good fats
  • No trans fat, and limited amounts of saturated fats, added/concentrated sugars and meats
  • Appropriate number of servings of the 4 food groups of Canada’s Food Guide:
      Fruits and vegetables, including 1 serving of dark green vegetables and 1 serving of orange vegetables every day
      Grain products, including a majority of whole grain products
      Low-fat milk and alternatives
      Meat and alternatives, including fish

The following additional targets only apply to diverticulitis:

  • A restricted intake of fiber and residue.
  • An appropriate daily amount of foods to limit (fermentable vegetables, including cruciferous, wheat and other whole grains, etc.)

The following table shows that our Diverticulosis Meal Plans have consistently met the nutritional recommendations since their launch, on February 23rd, 2012.

Nutritional information for diverticulitis and diverticulosis.
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IMPORTANT: The information provided on this website does not replace a medical consultation and is not intended for self diagnosis. We recommend that you seek the advice of your doctor or healthcare professional before undertaking a change to your diet or lifestyle. See Terms & Conditions.