Is Turmeric Beneficial for Health and for Athletes?

6 August, 2019 , , ,

Should you take a turmeric supplement?

According to studies performed with human subjects, doses of up to 8000 mg per day appear to be safe. Some minor side effects have been reported in some studies, such as diarrhea, headaches, rashes and yellow stools. However, it should be noted that the curcumin doses found in the various supplements available are not controlled and can be very variable. Because its bioavailability is limited, curcumin is often accompanied by piperine, an alkaloid found in black pepper, which promotes its absorption. On the other hand, care must be taken because piperine can also interact with certain drugs by slowing down their elimination. Turmeric can also stimulate gastric acid production in the stomach and can facilitate bleeding. Thus, the consumption of turmeric supplements is not recommended for pregnant women, people undergoing anticoagulant therapy or for those suffering from gastric ulcers. In short, you should consult your doctor before taking any supplements to make sure they are safe for you.

Finally, although turmeric has many potential therapeutic applications, further studies are needed to better understand its effects before recommending supplementation. In the meantime, it could be worthwhile to use turmeric regularly to cook with, for example in salad dressings, curry, soups, smoothies or marinades. Here are some recipe ideas to inspire you!

Zucchini Noodles with Shrimp and Broccoli

Zucchini Noodles with Shrimp and Broccoli

Zucchini Noodles with Shrimp and Broccoli

See the recipe >>

Avocado and Green Tea Smoothie

Avocado and Green Tea Smoothie

Avocado and Green Tea Smoothie

See the recipe >>

Scrambled Tofu

Scrambled Tofu

Scrambled Tofu

See the recipe >>


References

  • Wu (2003) Safety and anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin: a component of tumeric (Curcuma longa). J Altern Complement Med; 9(1):161-8.
  • Hay et coll. (2019) Therapeutic effects of turmeric in several diseases: An overview. Chem Biol Interact; 310:108729.
  • Tanabe et coll. (2019) Effects of oral curcumin ingested before or after eccentric exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Scand J Med Sci Sports; 29(4):524-534.
  • Rawson, Miles et Larson-Meyer (2018) Dietary Supplements for Health, Adaptation, and Recovery in Athletes. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab; 28(2):188-199.
  • Hewlings and Kalman (2017) Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health. Foods; 6(10): 92.
  • Tanabe et coll. (2019) Effects of oral curcumin ingested before or after eccentric exercise on markers of muscle damage and inflammation. Scand J Med Sci Sports; 29(4):524-534.
  • Daily, Yang et Park (2016) Efficacy of turmeric extracts and curcumin for alleviating the symptoms of joint arthritis: A Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. J. Med. Food; 19: 717–729.

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Author

Kathryn Adel

Kathryn Adel

Kathryn completed degrees in kinesiology and nutrition, as well as a Masters in Sports Nutrition. She is a member of OPDQ and of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She ran track and cross-country at a national level. Kathryn specializes in sports nutrition, weight loss, diabetes, as well as heart and gastrointestinal health. Kathryn is experienced with the low FODMAP diet and she completed the Monash University low FODMAP dietitian’s training.

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